Promotional codes, Part 2: How to make alphanumeric codes work for your promotions

alphanumeric codes as promotional codes

When it comes to driving in-store purchase, the power of on-pack promotions is unmatched by most marketing tools. Marketers have long used on-pack promotions to boost short-term sales, generate brand loyalty and awareness, and reward purchasers.

In Cracking the promotional code: Part 1, I talked about the benefits that Quick Response (QR) codes bring to promotional campaigns. While alphanumeric codes are not as new and exciting as QR codes, they are proven to deliver valuable benefits — the most pertinent being that they allow you to run a temporary on-pack campaign without repackaging your product. This makes them an extremely cost-effective way to generate a buzz around your product.

To ensure a successful on-pack promotion using alphanumeric codes, you need to follow three essential steps:

1. Get the right codes

It sounds simple, but finding a way to generate unique alphanumeric codes and keep a track of them is critical for any on-pack promotion. Matthews’ iDSnet can help you do that. iDSnet can generate and manage promotional codes as well as keep a record of what’s printed. All codes are stored in a central database along with the product information. With a streamlined system, message changes for the printers are quick and easy to do from one central location to ensure the correct code is put on the right product at the right time.

2. Create an engaging website

Like any promotional vehicle, alphanumeric codes do not work alone. Marketers have the best success with on-pack promotions when they create an engaging — sometimes even interactive — website to go along with the campaign. The formula rarely changes: the consumer buys the product, enters the unique code via the website and is rewarded with an exclusive brand experience. And, if they’re lucky, a prize.

At the same time, the brand owner is rewarded with opportunities to cross-promote and gather valuable customer data.

3. Get creative

To make your promotion stand out, the trick is to get creative and reward your customers with something they will want to come back for again and again. Several food and beverage brands have mastered this art — check out some of our favourites:

alphanumeric codes as promotional codes

 V Robbers is a campaign for V Energy drink consumers to “steal” their share of a $100,000 prize pool. V Robbers takes place in an online city, where players are assigned a hideout to store their cash. Players create an online alter ego, and, using a city map, they can hunt down the players who have stolen the most cash and form a plan of attack to steal their share. From February to 31 March 2013, specially marked ‘V Robbers’ cans held promo codes to enter the game and let players choose between protecting their cash or stealing cash from other players. The beauty of V Robbers is how it blurred the line between a traditional consumer promotion and an integrated brand idea. The online game rewarded consumers with an entertaining and engaging experience with V that might result in actual cash.

Chuck’s Lol-A-Coaster was a fully customised and interactive game as part of Chupa Chups’ 2012 consumer promotion. It gave three lucky consumers the chance to win a world trip to visit Chuck’s favourite rollercoasters. Entry into the competition was simple: buy a Chupa Chup, get the code and enter that code online. As well as entering the consumer into a prize draw, the codes unlocked hidden content and “Sweet Rides” on “Chuck’s Lol-A-Coaster”, with the goal being to prompt repeat plays and simultaneously drive sales.

My Coke Rewards is Coca-Cola’s long-running, customer-loyalty marketing program. Customers simply enter codes found on specially marked labels of Coca-Cola products onto the Coke Rewards website, or via text. The codes are converted into virtual points which can be redeemed for various prizes, such as home theatre systems, and sweepstakes entries. The program was first launched in 2006 and by November of that year, more than one million prizes had been redeemed. The program has since been extended every year for the past five years, with the current extension until the end of this year.

Carlton Dry ‘Shout a Share House offered the chance for five Aussie share houses to live in luxury for a year, rent-free and with the latest mod-cons. In 2011, five share houses won their rent and bills covered for an entire year, as well as a number of wish-list items — Foxtel, a cleaner, a Sonos wireless hi-fi system with unlimited streaming music, and a new bar fridge to chill their year’s supply of Carlton Dry. Entry was via the unique code found inside specially marked cartons and the engaging Carlton Dry Website.

 

For more information on how to integrate alphanumeric and QR codes as promotional codes onto your packaging, call us! They’re extremely cost-effective ways to a buzz around your product, without changing your packaging.

Here are 3 other hot labelling trends food & beverage manufacturers need to know.

echo adrotate_group(5, 0, 0, 0);
Trent Munro

Trent Munro

Manager – Strategy & Business Development at Matthews Australasia
Trent Munro is an accomplished business strategist, marketing innovator and speaker specialising in business development and optimisation. Over the past 15 years, he has worked across a range of blue-chip and medium enterprises including Goodyear Automotive, Clariant, Corona Manufacturing and Matthews Australasia. Trent holds a range of postgraduate and graduate qualifications in Commerce, Psychology, Project Management and Science. At Matthews Australasia, he has overseen market development locally and abroad, launching class leading traceability and automation technologies across manufacturing, healthcare and logistics.

by Trent Munro

Trent Munro is an accomplished business strategist, marketing innovator and speaker specialising in business development and optimisation. Over the past 15 years, he has worked across a range of blue-chip and medium enterprises including Goodyear Automotive, Clariant, Corona Manufacturing and Matthews Australasia. Trent holds a range of postgraduate and graduate qualifications in Commerce, Psychology, Project Management and Science. At Matthews Australasia, he has overseen market development locally and abroad, launching class leading traceability and automation technologies across manufacturing, healthcare and logistics.

2 thoughts on “Promotional codes, Part 2: How to make alphanumeric codes work for your promotions

  1. A. Kreger says:

    Some of the promotional codes are used for the directly promotion. Like if any package product give the promotional codes inside the package. And some of the shops give the offers of discounts with the promotional codes.

  2. Pingback: Cracking the promotional code, Part 1: QR codes

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *